Autopolis

The cars we loved.

1978-1982 Toyota Corona


1981 Toyota Corona Liftback

1981 Toyota Corona Liftback

The Toyota Corona had an almost 50 year history, starting back in 1957. It was only offered in the United States from 1960 to 1983. Always a front engine rear wheel drive layout, the Corona started out very small by American standards and gradually grew in size with each generation. By 1987 the sixth generation Corona was introduced.

78 Corona dashboard

78 Corona dashboard

Many variations of the car were available including a station wagon, sedan, coupe and a 5 door liftback being the most interesting. In other markets a sporty 2 door variant called the 2000GT was available. Larger than a Celica, with slightly more power, it was never offered in America. The Corona in America had by now received a fully independent suspension and the option of a 1.8 or 2.0 liter SOHC 4 cylinder engine (96 to 108 hp). The car remained rear wheel drive and featured the option of a 4 speed automatic or 5 speed manual. The Corona was marketed as a luxury car, but one with sporting performance. It shared the same 2.0 engine as the sporty Celicia coupe, but offered amenities like intermittent wipers, cruise control and power windows like a luxury car.

Sales of the Corona were good, but Toyota saw fit to make some adjustments to its line by tightening the gap between smaller Corolla and the larger Camry closer, thus eliminating the Corona in America. The Corona carried on in Europe and Asia through the 90, until it was only offered in Japan in the final years of its production cycle. The Corona is a common taxi car in much of Asia, being that it’s compact size, maneuverability  general comfort made it an ideal match for the job.

1978 Toyota Corona Liftback

1978 Toyota Corona Liftback

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One comment on “1978-1982 Toyota Corona

  1. Jason
    February 19, 2015

    I’ve always liked this generation Toyota Corona. If I could find one in good condition, I’d buy one. It doesn’t have to be perfect, like showroom condition, but it does have to be driveable, everything on the car has to work, and that it’s safe to drive. 🙂

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This entry was posted on October 26, 2009 by in 70's Cars, 80's Cars, Toyota.
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